Tag Archive | release

An Invitation

While generally, as worship leaders, we are prepared and ready to roll when the service starts, many of our congregants may not be ready at all. I’m certain at some point in your life you have experienced “Sunday morning craziness” to a degree. Often, it seems like when we finally make time to worship, pray, read or study the Bible, all sorts of things come up. Arguments with our spouses, aggravation from our kids, accusations in our thoughts about ourselves and our actions. More likely than not, these elements are distracting and weighty even to the point of paralyzing our ability to freely worship God.

A typical response is to run from God in that moment or try to hide these things from Him.

So, here’s the challenge: learn to see all of those distracting, annoying, condemning thoughts as an invitation. An invitation to get free from all the dirt that stuck to your feet on the way in. An invitation to let Jesus wash your feet.

The reality is: you’re clean, you’re good to go, Jesus paid the debt that you owed and His blood was enough. Life happens and our feet get dirty along the way, but don’t let that keep you from enjoying God in worship. Cast all of those cares, fears, concerns and any other baggage weighing you down on Him. Do it right away. Release it. Let go. Surrender to His overwhelming love for you.

Whatever comes to the surface of your heart and mind, give it to God as part of your worship. We need not suffer any shame in His presence. No embarrassment here. Only life, peace and joy.

As worship leaders, part of our responsibility is to help those gathered in worship to understand this invitation. Corporate worship is always better when people are free.

Are you familiar with this invitation? What are some ways you have helped others to take it?

Learning to Flow

Flow. It’s an important thing every worship leader should know how to do. Yet, in my experience, flow isn’t usually something that’s taught. True, some things are easier “caught than taught”, but we still need to talk about it.

So, what is flow? Definitely not a technical term. Flow is the ability to transcend the plan/roadmap/agenda/itemized schedule and be free to adjust on the fly. Flow is what keeps the worship service from feeling stagnant or “going through the motions.” Flow provides momentum like an undercurrent that takes you faster than you can paddle. Flow keeps the worship team and the congregation together in a unified direction. Flow is the satisfying feeling of riding a bike downhill or canoeing downstream. Flow is like flying. When you don’t have it you feel grounded, tied down. Like you’re pulling a load of bricks in a wagon with no wheels (anybody else ever lead a set like that?).

Flow is a release of control. A following of the Spirit.

As with many things in life, flow is something you cultivate in your bedroom when no one is watching. Your personal interaction with the Lord in worship is the place to start. I don’t know anyone who plans a worship set for their personal worship time.

First I’m going to sing… followed by a cool key change… then I’ll wrap up with a remix version of my favorite hymn…

Who does that?

Since worship isn’t really about the songs, all we need to bring is our hearts. The adoration of God’s grace. The thankfulness for His mercy. The expectancy of our hope. Whether spoken, sung, laughed or cried, the movements of our hearts are what move His heart. God’s not impressed with your voice as an artist. It’s not the precise combination of pitch and rhythm that excite Him.

So at home, there’s no performance. Just you and God. Enjoying the presence and love of each other. From this place, what do you do? Maybe sing or say a prayer. What comes next? We have a dialogue. As we minister to God, He ministers to us. His word brings life. It awakens passion, desire or simply peace. Then we respond. And He responds. You get the idea.

Corporate worship can be the same. Should be the same. A wonderful dialogue (aka not a monologue) between God and His people. As the worship leader, we have the ability, even responsibility, to release God’s response for His people.

I should have titled this, “An Introduction to Flow.” I have way too much to say here and now. But let me encourage you to begin practicing flow. Do it at home by yourself. Practice with your friends or worship team. Let your worship become more of a release. Sing spontaneous songs. Be free.

Release your song.